“To grow up healthy, children need to sit less and play more.”

Children under five must spend less time sitting watching screens, or restrained in prams and seats, get better quality sleep and have more time for active play if they are to grow up healthy” – World Health Organization (WHO).

Screen time is a sensitive subject at the best of times for most families. However, now in a world of virtual birthday parties, and Zoom classes and with both parents and children spending a lot more of their time at home, it’s becoming increasingly more difficult to know when and how to put limits and restrictions on your child’s screen time.      

There are many benefits to reduced screen time including “improving physical activity, reducing sedentary time and ensuring quality sleep in young children which will improve their physical, mental health and wellbeing, and help prevent childhood obesity and associated diseases later in life,” says Dr Fiona Bull, programme manager for surveillance and population-based prevention of noncommunicable diseases, at WHO.

At St. George’s, we understand that it’s often difficult to limit screen time at home, that’s why at nursery, we plan a range of activities that don’t involve screens! We encourage children to play and learn outside in our beautiful large gardens, we encourage yoga, music, singing and dancing, we read and listen to stories from our teachers and peers and we do lots of sensory play including activities with water, play dough and sand. For more activities, please see https://stgeorgesnursery.com/age-group/.

The wide range of activities we do at St. George’s Nursery helps to keep the children active, fit and healthy, as well as to boost their imagination, creativity and enhance their motor and social skills.

Here are a few things you can do at home too…

Start by recognising that with so much more happening online nowadays, some screen time is inevitable. However, there are techniques you can use to limit this:

“When we tell kids not to do something, we almost always need to tell them what to be doing instead,” says Stephanie Lee, PsyD, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute.

Develop a non-screen activity menu with your children that includes their various other favourite activities, such as cooking and baking, arts & crafts or even teaching pets new tricks. This will help when they are feeling fed up or bored, they have a variety at options ready to go. 

Your children may try to reject your new system and act grumpy for the first couple of days. Children often try their luck with new restrictions and try to gauge how firm they really are. If you keep with the plan, rejection and push back are likely to disappear and your children will become accustomed to their new routines.

This definitely won’t be an easy one but it’s important to lead by example. Children are likely to replicate behaviours such as putting your screens away at certain times of time every day. Not only will this help your children decrease the time they spend on their screens, but could also help you control the amount of time you spend doing the same and could give you more valuable and mindful time with your children.

Lockdown 2.0 is here… Does that mean you are back to working from home with the children around? Crying babies? Toddlers singing and dancing? Paperwork go missing? Zoom meetings with your boss whilst your children are doing a fashion show in the background? Yep you’re not the only ones!!

Check out some of the pictures below of some of the hilarious work from home situations some parents found themselves in!

Mental health problems affect roughly 1 in 10 children and young people. The most common mental health problems seen in children are anxiety, ADHD, conduct disorders or learning disabilities.

Alarmingly, 70% of children and young people who experience mental health problems have no had appropriate interventions at the right age.⁣

The emotional well-being of children and young people is just as important as their physical health. Most children can start to show signs of mental health difficulties from a young age but often times these are misdiagnosed or ignored.

Because young people process information, events and emotions differently, nurturing children’s health is influential on their mental health as adults.⁣

Teaching children and young people healthy coping mechanisms, how to regulate strong emotions, how to create a safe space which is welcome to emotional and physical expression are all ways we can try to promote good mental health in children.

The start of good mental health in children leads to the development of well-round and resilient adults. Additionally promoting good mental health helps lead children into dealing with daily struggles and adversities much better in adulthood and helps them grow into strong self-confident individuals.

Head over to the http://www.theminddoc.co.uk/ for more on mental health.

The world is moving in a dangerous direction, and if we want our children to grow up into a natural world anything like our own, we need to act now. A warming globe and wasteful behaviour could threaten food stocks, increase extreme weather, lead to flooding, and destroy precious ecosystems.

Why do we at St. George’s Nursery need to be more sustainable?

Sustainability can be defined as ‘development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’.

At St. George’s, we’ve been working hard to think of lots of ways that we can act more eco-friendly. Why? Because we want to ensure that we are doing everything we can in order to help minimise the detrimental effects of certain human activities but more importantly we understand that the path to a more sustainable Earth will depend on how we educate the next generation. We want children to grow up with an understanding of how to look after the planet, and in turn, go on to influence others with their behaviour. The earlier you can teach these core principles, the better.

Children should be taught to respect and care for the world they live in from a young age, if they do, they are more likely to preserve it and consume more appropriately. This could help reduce the consumption of plastic in the future. One of the best ways for children to learn about the environment is to experience it.

Our aim is to empower our children, raise environmental awareness amongst parents, children and the wider community, and improve the overall school environment.  

So what are we doing to help?

Our eco-committees, made up of both children and staff, have been learning about various topics such as biodiversity, energy, transport, water, waste and litter and have been implementing various new measures around the nursery.

From reducing waste and using more eco-friendly products, to conserving water and energy, we want to continue to educate ourselves and our children to lead healthier lives, make more mindful choices and protect the beautiful world in which we live.

How can parents help?

Help to reinforce what the children are learning at nursery – from recycling, reducing waste and reducing energy consumption to walking more/ taking more public transport to reduce our carbon footprint.

Wherever you live, take your child outside into nature, whether it is in a local park, or just outdoors, they can learn so much about nature from seeing it and being part of it. They need to understand that they have a shared responsibility to protect the animals and trees that they love so much.

“Looking after the world around us has never been more important than it is today. It’s up to us to take positive actions now so that future generations have a whole, healthy planet to grow up in.

But most importantly of all, we act as role models for your children, showing them how to look after the planet, teaching them about the living world and its precious resources, and fostering their love for nature.”

At St. George’s Nursery, we take pride in the fact that we have such dedicated long-term staff, who are passionate about both childcare as well as St. George’s.

Every single one of our staff makes each child and their families feel welcome, ensuring that all children are safe, happy and learning. They go above and beyond to foster an environment where our children, their families and our fellow colleagues feel a part of the family.

39 members of the St. George’s family have been with us for 5+ years! Many of the team members in the list below started with us in their teens! They are constantly building on their knowledge and skills and their passion for what they do continues to grow stronger and stronger.  

Below is a list of our long-term employees (10+ years with St. George’s), and how long they have been a part of the St. George’s family. We are grateful to each and every one of the employees below, for their hard work over the years as well as their commitment, loyalty and dedication.

SiteNameYears at
St. George’s Nursery
HQRoxanna Lowe26
OadbySam McDonagh 26
NarboroughTracy Copson23
EnderbySue Corderoy 20
Grace RoadKerry Lakin20
HQLiz Gates19
OadbyFiona Washington19
OadbyVictoria Joseph – Walker19
HQAnna Smith 17
CityLisa Anderson17
EnderbyShelley Tuckwood16
OadbyLesley Harris 15
Grace RoadKelly Winston 14
Grace RoadAngela Brewin13
OadbyJyoti Solanki 13
OadbyNicola Lane 13
NarboroughLaura Flitton 12
EnderbyLisa Halford 12
Grace RoadTabasam Bhatti 11
EnderbyLaura Whitehouse 10
Grace RoadBela Patel 10

The British Red Cross states that first aid is giving assistance to someone hurt or ill, before expert medical help is given. Not only does first aid help in everyday accidents and illnesses but can also save lives.

Current guidance from the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) states that only one person with a paediatric first aid certificate needs to be on site and available within a childcare setting. However, at St. George’s Nursery, we go above and beyond these minimum requirements. Each and every one of our staff is trained in paediatric first aid and each of our sites has been accredited the Millie’s Mark award*.

We strongly believe that following a medical emergency, the ability and confidence to administer timely and suitable first aid is a vital skill for those looking after others. Therefore, we made the decision to ensure that all of our 100% of our staff are fully aware of what to do in a paediatric emergency first aid situation and provide reassurance to parents that their children and happy and learning, but above all – safe.

* Millie’s Mark will be awarded as a special endorsement to childcare providers that go above and beyond these minimum requirements by having 100% of staff trained in paediatric first aid, and also ensuring that everything learned during the course is kept alive and in the forefront of practitioners’ minds so that they are confident, ready and capable. It acknowledges that children’s safety is at the forefront of the provider’s mind when they care for your child.

See more pictures from the paediatric first aid training course in August 2020 here – https://stgeorgesnursery.com/News/paediatric-first-aid-course-leicester-childcare/

#StopTheSpread

News about the Coronavirus pandemic is everywhere.

It is becoming increasingly difficult to control the news that we consume, or to shield children from upsetting information.

What you can do is to help minimise the negative impact it has on your children.

You can do this through open and honest conversations at home.

Here are some top tips: