“The greatest gift of Easter is hope!”

https://www.justgiving.com/fun…/st-georges-nursery-schools

In the lead up to Easter, we will be raising money for Women’s Aid Leicestershire. The money that we raise for this local charity will provide vital assistance to victims of domestic abuse and sexual violence.

In March 2020, all domestic abuse charities sounded the alarm. From the beginning of the nationwide COVID-19 lockdown, their helplines experienced a sharp rise in calls from victim-survivors, and saw early evidence of domestic abuse cases escalating, featuring high levels of physical violence and coercive control.

Domestic homicides more than doubled in the first three weeks of lockdown. The three Lockdowns have led to an escalation of Domestic Violence with an increased demand for Women’s Aid’s services.

Let’s come together and win this fight against violence and domestic abuse. Let’s help to provide strength and freedom to those who need it the most. #TogetherWeCanMakeADifference

In the run up to Easter, we will be carrying out various fun activities for our children, parents and staff, in order to raise money for this great cause. Activities include Easter egg hunts, an Easter quiz Easter card making, a an Easter Zoom Fundraising Showcase, and dress up days for children and staff!

In November, we asked parents to help us with our Big Collection by donating items such as warm clothing, unopened food tins and other dried food, hygiene items such as nappies and female sanitary products.

We would like to thank everyone who donated so generously and help us to support so many families in need across Leicestershire💛

Here is the link to our feature on BBC East Midlands today: https://fb.watch/2jcIbOlNMd/

 “To grow up healthy, children need to sit less and play more.”

Children under five must spend less time sitting watching screens, or restrained in prams and seats, get better quality sleep and have more time for active play if they are to grow up healthy” – World Health Organization (WHO).

Screen time is a sensitive subject at the best of times for most families. However, now in a world of virtual birthday parties, and Zoom classes and with both parents and children spending a lot more of their time at home, it’s becoming increasingly more difficult to know when and how to put limits and restrictions on your child’s screen time.      

There are many benefits to reduced screen time including “improving physical activity, reducing sedentary time and ensuring quality sleep in young children which will improve their physical, mental health and wellbeing, and help prevent childhood obesity and associated diseases later in life,” says Dr Fiona Bull, programme manager for surveillance and population-based prevention of noncommunicable diseases, at WHO.

At St. George’s, we understand that it’s often difficult to limit screen time at home, that’s why at nursery, we plan a range of activities that don’t involve screens! We encourage children to play and learn outside in our beautiful large gardens, we encourage yoga, music, singing and dancing, we read and listen to stories from our teachers and peers and we do lots of sensory play including activities with water, play dough and sand. For more activities, please see http://stgeorgesnursery.com/age-group/.

The wide range of activities we do at St. George’s Nursery helps to keep the children active, fit and healthy, as well as to boost their imagination, creativity and enhance their motor and social skills.

Here are a few things you can do at home too…

Start by recognising that with so much more happening online nowadays, some screen time is inevitable. However, there are techniques you can use to limit this:

“When we tell kids not to do something, we almost always need to tell them what to be doing instead,” says Stephanie Lee, PsyD, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute.

Develop a non-screen activity menu with your children that includes their various other favourite activities, such as cooking and baking, arts & crafts or even teaching pets new tricks. This will help when they are feeling fed up or bored, they have a variety at options ready to go. 

Your children may try to reject your new system and act grumpy for the first couple of days. Children often try their luck with new restrictions and try to gauge how firm they really are. If you keep with the plan, rejection and push back are likely to disappear and your children will become accustomed to their new routines.

This definitely won’t be an easy one but it’s important to lead by example. Children are likely to replicate behaviours such as putting your screens away at certain times of time every day. Not only will this help your children decrease the time they spend on their screens, but could also help you control the amount of time you spend doing the same and could give you more valuable and mindful time with your children.

Lockdown 2.0 is here… Does that mean you are back to working from home with the children around? Crying babies? Toddlers singing and dancing? Paperwork go missing? Zoom meetings with your boss whilst your children are doing a fashion show in the background? Yep you’re not the only ones!!

Check out some of the pictures below of some of the hilarious work from home situations some parents found themselves in!

Mental health problems affect roughly 1 in 10 children and young people. The most common mental health problems seen in children are anxiety, ADHD, conduct disorders or learning disabilities.

Alarmingly, 70% of children and young people who experience mental health problems have no had appropriate interventions at the right age.⁣

The emotional well-being of children and young people is just as important as their physical health. Most children can start to show signs of mental health difficulties from a young age but often times these are misdiagnosed or ignored.

Because young people process information, events and emotions differently, nurturing children’s health is influential on their mental health as adults.⁣

Teaching children and young people healthy coping mechanisms, how to regulate strong emotions, how to create a safe space which is welcome to emotional and physical expression are all ways we can try to promote good mental health in children.

The start of good mental health in children leads to the development of well-round and resilient adults. Additionally promoting good mental health helps lead children into dealing with daily struggles and adversities much better in adulthood and helps them grow into strong self-confident individuals.

Head over to the http://www.theminddoc.co.uk/ for more on mental health.

At St. George’s Nursery, we take pride in the fact that we have such dedicated long-term staff, who are passionate about both childcare as well as St. George’s.

Every single one of our staff makes each child and their families feel welcome, ensuring that all children are safe, happy and learning. They go above and beyond to foster an environment where our children, their families and our fellow colleagues feel a part of the family.

39 members of the St. George’s family have been with us for 5+ years! Many of the team members in the list below started with us in their teens! They are constantly building on their knowledge and skills and their passion for what they do continues to grow stronger and stronger.  

Below is a list of our long-term employees (10+ years with St. George’s), and how long they have been a part of the St. George’s family. We are grateful to each and every one of the employees below, for their hard work over the years as well as their commitment, loyalty and dedication.

SiteNameYears at
St. George’s Nursery
HQRoxanna Lowe26
OadbySam McDonagh 26
NarboroughTracy Copson23
EnderbySue Corderoy 20
Grace RoadKerry Lakin20
HQLiz Gates19
OadbyFiona Washington19
OadbyVictoria Joseph – Walker19
HQAnna Smith 17
CityLisa Anderson17
EnderbyShelley Tuckwood16
OadbyLesley Harris 15
Grace RoadKelly Winston 14
Grace RoadAngela Brewin13
OadbyJyoti Solanki 13
OadbyNicola Lane 13
NarboroughLaura Flitton 12
EnderbyLisa Halford 12
Grace RoadTabasam Bhatti 11
EnderbyLaura Whitehouse 10
Grace RoadBela Patel 10

“For some children lockdown has been an opportunity to flourish. All that quality unstructured time spent with parents and siblings has been precious, if at times challenging. But in the case of too many other children it’s been a very different story.

With no grandparents, nannies or nurseries to keep their children entertained and stimulated, working from home parents have had little choice but resorting to iPad or TV screen as digital childminder for up to eight hours a day. Cooped up and without the interaction they’d normally get at nursery, primary school or toddler group, under-fives have just not been engaging or speaking enough – and in some cases this has left them unable to string a sentence together. 

Shermeena Rabbi, Consultant Speech & Language Therapist says: “Usually children’s vocabulary develops naturally from playing with other children. They learn from interactions at soft play, nursery and toddler classes. Not having these opportunities has left many nursery-aged children with delayed verbal skills”. Citing the parents of a two year old who was barely speaking or engaging with them, “unfortunately their reliance on technology as a pacifier has had negative effects”.”

Encouraging good mental health for children starts from the reflection of good self-care implemented by the people around them. Caregivers & parents are great role models to teach children the importance of self-care and encouraging good mental health habits, here are some simple ways we can implement good self-care and mental health within children:⁣⁣
⁣⁣
🏡 Creating a safe, welcoming, and non-judgemental space where children are allowed the freedom of their emotional expression⁣⁣

👩🏽‍🤝‍👨🏾 Encourage them to attend social groups/activities that promote their self-confidence and give them a sense of belonging⁣⁣
⁣⁣
❤️ Accept who they are & recognise what they are good at.⁣⁣
⁣⁣
🥰 Make them feel loved, trusted, understood and more importantly that their feelings are valued⁣⁣
⁣⁣
😐 Help them articulate emotions they may have difficulty understanding⁣⁣
⁣⁣
🗣 SHARE YOUR OWN FEELINGS in order to help them normalise some of their own.⁣⁣

There are many ways in which we can encourage children and young people to be more self-aware, expressive and understanding of their emotions. Sharing our own emotions may leave us vulnerable but at the same time sharing what we are feeling gives our children permission to do the same, if you can’t implement all of these ways I encourage you to start by simply sharing your emotions with your children.⁣

Check out @theminddoc for more!!

Nursery schools present “very little risk” and are Covid-safe, vaccine minister Nadhim Zahawi has said, as he defended keeping them open.

Mr Zahawi contrasted nurseries with schools, which were closed because they had been “vectors for the new variant”.” – BBC News

Mr Williamson said evidence from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) found that early years education had a very small impact on transmission rates.

The health, safety and well-being of every child, employee and all of their families is our priority. Throughout this pandemic, we have taken practical steps, and implemented robust measures, to ensure the welfare of the whole St. George’s family.

This ranges from more rigorous and more frequent cleaning and hygiene practices to pick-up and drop-off changes and controlled and strict access to our nurseries. We have been helping to manage any anxiety the children may be feeling by explaining what Covid is and encouraging them to be open about their feelings and any worries.

Some of the measures we have put in place include:

All children must be dropped and collected at the front door of the nursery. No one is permitted into the nursery other than the children and staff, and no one is allowed into the nursery if they (or a member of their household) show Covid-19 symptoms (until they have completed their self-isolation period).

Regular risk assessments are carried out and updated following any new rules, regulation or government announcements.

Hands must be regularly washed and sanitized throughout the day and the correct hand washing procedures must be followed. Frequently touched items including surfaces are cleaned and disinfected regularly and deep cleaning occurs each day including the use of antiviral fogging machines in each room.

Furthermore, our nurseries are fitted with air exchange systems. This acts as an air filtration system that continuously allows fresh air into the rooms and extracts stale air from the rooms.

Windows are also kept open for the majority of the day for further ventilation (weather permitting).

Outdoor play will also be staggered and equipment cleaned after a group has used it. Staff and children will have their own stationary, and the use of activities which could pose a risk of cross contamination (e.g. play dough / sand) will not be allowed. All children and staff must bring a pair of indoor and outdoor shoes. Indoor shoes must remain at the nursery and as soon as the child/staff arrives, shoes must be changed to these.

We also have various protocols in place should anyone develop symptoms whilst at nursery. If you would like to know more about any of the changes we have made, please refer to our Covid risk assessment or call / email your nursery manager who will be able to provide you with more information.

Thanks again for your continued support and cooperation.

We will sustain the present efforts in protecting everyone in our St. George’s family, as well as continuing to provide the highest possible care for our children. We have an ‘open door’ policy here at St. George’s Nursery, so if you have any questions or queries, please don’t hesitate to contact your site manager.